13
Sep
2014
Posted by Nicole in 1950s, 1960s, 1970s, Style icon

Over the last decade I’ve noticed a worrying trend – dressing down to travel.

Now, I don’t know about you but I don’t get to travel enough and it’s always a treat.

Whether it’s for work or pleasure, the way you dress affects how you feel and how you’re treated. I get that you’d like to feel comfortable, but there’s no reason why casual clothes have to be as ugly and unflattering as tracksuits or pyjamas, items which are best kept for private spaces, not public ones.

An article in Slate by J. Bryan Lowder called “Take a One-Way Trip From Tatty to Natty” has the following to say:

When we dress well for travel, we are not only making ourselves look good; we’re also signaling that we are invested in making this shared experience pleasant for everyone around us. Think of it as a kind of sartorial social contract: Honor it and your minor efforts make transit a more pleasing activity; break it, and reveal your misanthropic narcissism to, quite literally, the world. What else to call putting one’s own base comforts above the comfort of all?

Here’s some inspiration from Mad Men – now wouldn’t it brighten your day to arrive at the airport to be greeted with fellow travellers dressed so boldly? Sit me next to any of those people please.

Made Men, season seven

Back in the real world, let’s look at what Jane Birkin and Serge Gainsbourg wore for a flight in 1968.

Gainsbourg Birkin 68

Jane looks relaxed in a short, knit dress with over the knee socks and a long coat over the top. Gold hoop ear rings and simple and fresh hair and make up – her grooming is good, her style comfortable and yet smart, showing off her best feature (thighs to die for). I’m sure she has stylish low-heeled shoes, just out of frame.

Not to be outdone, Serge has a loose suit, open necked shirt and is that a cravat I see? Lace up oxford style brogues are vastly superior to sneakers and look infinitely better whilst not relinquishing much comfort.

They’re both dressed in quality clothes that are versatile as well as photogenic. Upon arrival, they could head straight to an art gallery or cocktail bar. This is an easy look for all of us with a little thought. This look, although from almost fifty years ago still looks pretty good don’t you think?

Similar techniques are favoured in these celebrity photos from the ’50s to the ’70s – comfortable but smart clothes, lowish heels, a jacket, coat or cardigan for warmth in air conditioned cabins and good grooming and accessories.

Vadim Fonda 65
Roger Vadim and Jane Fonda in 1965. No wonder he fancies her.

Bardot 66
Brigitte Bardot in 1966. Knits are perfect for travel – I’d have my camera out too if more travellers dressed like BB.

Burton Taylor 66
Richard Burton and Elizabeth Taylor in 1966. Luxury glamour – Liz could have anything under that fur coat, even a tracksuit but somehow I doubt it.

Deneuve 61
Catherine Deneuve in 1961 – scarves are the ultimate in travel accessories, versatile and fold up in your bag.

Dunaway 67
Faye Dunaway in 1967. Product placement, vintage style.

Grace Kelly 50
Grace Kelly in 1950. The perfect coat for travelling, could double as a blanket on cold flights.

Jackie 66
Jackie Kennedy in 1966. Elegant white alaskine (silk and wool) coatdress with bracelet length sleeves.

Jagger Faithfull 69
Mick Jagger and Marianne Faithfull in 1969. I love her faux-Victorian style button boots.

Jerry Hall 79
Jerry Hall in 1979 in hand-knitted cardigan and high waisted jeans. A concord flight tag makes a good lux accessory on her overnight bag.

Shrimnpton 66
Jean Shrimpton in 1966 – just beautiful. Surely someone will offer to carry her suitcase?

All photos by Getty - image source here, where you will find more glamour airport fashion.


11
Sep
2014
Posted by Nicole in 1950s, 1960s, Contest, Film, Shop talk, Television 15 Comments

Over the last ten years, there’s a long list of film, theatre and TV productions that have utilised costumes and props from Circa. It’s one of the aspects of my work that pleases me the most – contributing in a small way to creative projects.

Since moving to the city in 2012 and focusing more on the webshop, this part of my business has increased a lot and I like to think that I’m making it easier for costumers around the country to find what they’re looking for. Here are a couple of recent works.

Anna in “A Place to Call Home” wore one of Circa’s ’50s gowns for her wedding.

aptch_wedding_630x354_008_19rch58-19rch9h
Image source, reproduced courtesy Channel Seven.

The locally made science fiction/time traveller film “Predestination” featured many of our original pieces including several ’60s dresses in this scene.

2013_04_23-Predestination_0234
Image Source.

Costume Designer Wendy Cork was kind enough to name check Circa as a source in this interview about costuming the film – thanks Wendy!

Now I have something for you – we currently have two-for-one tickets to see the new Woody Allen film “Magic in the Moonlight”, set in 1920s south of France (and believe me, the eye candy is wonderful. It almost makes me miss summer). I’m including them in webshop orders but you can pick them up in the shop too.

MV5BMjI5NTk2Njc4Nl5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTgwMTgwNDcxMjE@._V1__SX1617_SY845_
Magic in the Moonlight with Colin Firth and Emma Stone.

Also, we have four double passes to the new Nick Cave film “20,000 Days on Earth”. If you’d like to win one, leave a comment on this blog post about your favourite Nick Cave, Bad Seeds, Birthday Party or Boys Next Door track. Contest closes midnight Saturday night, and winners will be chosen at random. Good luck!

Nick-Cave-20000-Days-On-Earth-lead3-768x512
Image Source.

The shop will be closed next week so I can have a short break, and then I will be expanding the shop trading hours to Monday to Friday, 10am to 5.30pm.

You’re welcome to come and visit me any time during these hours for browsing but I encourage appointments if you’re making a special trip or require advice, as I’ll need to fit all my other commitments into them and will sometimes be closed.

This change will mean that I can list more items online, with a wider variety including more accessories and menswear. Anything purchased online can be returned for a refund for any reason, so there’s no risk if you can’t come and try it on.

My book on demystifying fashion, “Style is Eternal” is now available for pre-order from Melbourne University Publishing at a 10% discount and will be released on December 1st. Can’t wait! Hopefully there will be a book launch.

SiE cover 475

Don’t forget to leave a comment so you can see the Nick Cave film!


29
Aug
2014
Posted by Nicole in 1960s, Calendar, Talk

Hi all,

I’ve got a talk coming up on ’60s fashion, as part of the “Polyester and Pantyhose” exhibition now on. It’s a free event and includes afternoon tea. I’ll be bringing some favourite pieces from my private collection as well as a sneak peak of some styles that will be featured in my upcoming book “Style is Eternal” (out December 1st). There will also be an opportunity to see the exhibition after the talk.

What: Talk on 1960s Australian ladieswear and afternoon tea.
When: Tuesday 9 September, 2pm
Where: The Gallery, Bayside Arts and Cultural Centre, Brighton Town Hall, cnr Carpenter and Wilson Streets, Brighton.
Cost: free but bookings required as limited numbers available – phone 9592 0291
For more information see here: the Bayside council site.

Pantyhose and Polyester 475
A photo from the exhibition, reproduced courtesy Bayside council.


7
Aug
2014
Posted by Nicole in 1950s, 1960s

As my work on my upcoming book is coming to a close, I’ve been releasing many pieces from my collection that were included in my first book “Love Vintage”.

You can see some of these in the shop right now and as they’re ready to go online you will see them in their own category in the webshop.

I’ve had a lot of requests for these pieces over the years, so here’s an opportunity to make one your own, and wear it out for a special occasion.

Circa Vintage Webshop July 2014 303

Circa Vintage Webshop July 2014 193

Circa Vintage Webshop July 2014 200

Circa Vintage Webshop July 2014 211

Circa Vintage Webshop July 2014 227

Circa Vintage Webshop July 2014 231


1
Aug
2014
Posted by Nicole in 1960s, Australian Fashion, Calendar, Exhibitions

A next exhibition of ’60s Australian fashion and photography opens next week in Brighton.

From the Artshub website:
Featuring key looks from throughout the decade, this exhibition traces the diversification of women’s fashion from the classic silhouette of the late 1950s to the wild ‘hippie’ styles of the early 1970s.

Bringing together a succinct selection of dresses, suits and gowns created by key Melbourne labels, Polyester & Pantyhose delineates popular silhouettes from the A-line Mod look to billowing maxi shapes. A suite of glamorous photographs by the celebrated Melbourne fashion photographer Bruno Benini will also be on display.

In addition to designs by Prue Acton, Tullo and Merivale, the exhibition will feature the 1963 Gown of the Year designed by Hartnell of Melbourne, and local model Coral Knowles’ wedding dress, commissioned by the Australian Wool Board in 1966.

I’ll also be presenting an afternoon tea talk on ’60s fashions to accompany the exhibition – the talk will be on Tuesday 9th September at 2pm. Bookings required – call 9592 0291 or email bacc@bayside.vic.gov.au. Seats and scones are limited.

What: Polyester and Pantyhose – Silhouettes of the ‘Sixties, fashion exhibition
When: 9 August – 28 September 2014, Open Wednesday to Friday 11am – 5pm, Saturday and Sunday 1pm – 5pm.
Where: The Gallery, Bayside Arts and Cultural Centre, Brighton Town Hall, cnr Carpenter and Wilson Streets, Brighton.
Cost: free entry.
For more information contact: Bayside City Council

Circa is lending some ’60s fashion and accessories to the exhibition too.

Polyester & Pantyhose-1


26
Jun
2014
Posted by Nicole in 1950s, 1960s, Film, Style icon 1 Comment

Audrey Hepburn and Hubert de Givenchy – one of the greatest collaborations in the history of fashion.

I’ve been treating myself to some Audrey films lately: first Sabrina, and then Charade. She’s wonderful!

I was travelling on the Metro in Paris, when I noticed the headlines: “Audrey Hepburn est morte”, so for me Audrey and Paris will always go together: I’m sure she would approve. She loved Paris, and Paris loved her – both Sabrina and Charade feature scenes in Paris and it was here that she met the young Givenchy at his first, informal fashion show. Audrey was sixteen but she didn’t forget: “when the time came and she could choose, she thought, ‘That’s the guy.’”

Audrey was impossibly slim and chic, and yet, childlike and joyous. You got the feeling that she would be enormous fun, that she didn’t take herself too seriously and that for her, dressing well was about taste and quality – and then wearing couture like it was the most natural thing in the world!

She became Givenchy’s muse and wore his designs in her films – here are some snaps I found on Pinterest. I love her style, it’s simple and elegant and uniquely Audrey. Fussy clothes would swamp her delicate frame but these allow her to shine.

She said of Givenchy “His are the only clothes in which I feel myself. He is far more than a couturier, he is a creator of personality.” Something tells me that Audrey had copious personality, it was Givenchy’s fashions that offered the freedom to express it.

fe74c011f850704026ae793de94dd77f

4e4c1bd211e0553f64003f2d4842bc49

7bc3f83c3cd6fcfd1317e9d783b0b8f5

19bd2c5b810d69cd0c22f7366ed40345

701a0ecea0fbd4a2137e7943ce002fa0

Audrey-Charade1963_-400x500

audreyhepburn1.jpg_gallery_max

da8a7a9b3d15cbad01f72b37bfc09f80

dc1edf7391b73fd7ad1ebcbcbdc38ba0

f5dc463b897d75f505834c64df51d2af

faae6079040c1d0b54d195cd8d82f436


10
Jun
2014
Posted by Nicole in 1960s, 1970s, Calendar

Opening this Friday, Hawkeye Vintage is offering unworn designer vintage fashion and the last of the famed Mary Lipshut collection of ’60s and ’80s – here you will find brand new vintage fashions from Missoni, Pucci and Courreges, with their original swing tags amongst many other fabulous labels.

Mary Lipshut amassed an incredible collection of European fashion and this once in a lifetime opportunity is not to be missed.

You can read Philip Boon’s lovely tribute to Mary here, including some of her amazing styles which hopefully will be available this weekend. Lady Melbourne also has written a fine blog post about her including many pics of her fashions – see here.

As always, be there early to snaffle the best buys.

What: Hawkeye and Mary Lipshut designer vintage fashion sale
When: 10am-4pm, Friday June 13th to Sunday June 15th.
Where: Como House, corner of Williams Rd and Lechlade Ave, South Yarra.
10% of all sales support the National Trust.

courreges 475
Danielle from Hawkeye Vintage in Courreges – photo supplied by Alison Waters.

Layout 1


27
May
2014
Posted by Nicole in 1950s, 1960s, Contest, Film 7 Comments

Next week sees the opening of new film “Grace of Monaco” and Entertainment One Australia have offered some double passes to Circa readers.

Grace Market 475

“Grace of Monaco” is a fictionalised version of events in Princess Grace of Monaco’s life in 1962. Six years after Grace Kelly married Prince Ranier, she was mother to two children and sought to return to Hollywood for the Hitchcock film “Marnie”.

I read a fascinating biography of Grace once, and her life was a complicated and enthralling one. She was an interesting woman. I also enjoyed the exhibition a few years ago of her personal wardrobe that was on display at the Bendigo Art Gallery – the trailer reveals a beautiful film full of luxurious and historical settings and costumes.

If you’d like a double pass to see this film, which opens on June 5th, simply leave a comment on this post about your favourite Grace Kelly film and why you like it – and the winners will be the best responses. There are four double passes to win and entries close Saturday May 31st at 9pm Melbourne time. Passes are valid at most screenings in Australia.

Good luck!

Grace couch 475

Grace Poster 475

I also have several two-for-one tickets for “The Broken Circle Breakdown”: “the story of Elise and Didier, two unconventional star-crossed lovers, who fall for each other despite their differences. He talks, she listens. He’s a romantic atheist, she’s a free-spirited realist”: just come into Circa and request one. Opens May 22nd.


3
Dec
2013
Posted by Nicole in 1960s, Sewing, Shop talk 4 Comments

As a costumer I rarely use patterns when I sew – generally I just draft from scratch – and yet I’ve managed to accumulate over a thousand vintage patterns. I can’t resist them! Often when I go to see people’s wardrobes, there will also be patterns (and fabric, that’s another story) and they’re one of those things that can all so easily be thrown out.

Listing some of my patterns on the webshop today I noticed this style that incorporates a lot of what I look for in a frock: plunging V neckline, nice big full bishop sleeves, empire line, assorted lengths.

pa0416 475

I also wanted to pin down the date: was it late ’60s or early ’70s? Despite fashions changing rapidly during this decade, popular styles clung on, sometimes for a long time. As I’ve mentioned previously, vintage patterns can be much easier to date than finished garments because you have clues in the style of artwork, hair and make up plus accessories. The full hairstyle on the blonde suggests pretty close to 1970, as do her chunky heeled shoes (visible just under the hem of her long black maxi).

Google is your friend – I quickly found the Vintage Pattern Wiki entry – a great resource if you haven’t discovered it yet – which supplied the date. 1969, and reissued in 1970 – and a number of places you can buy it online. The prices were surprisingly high, suggesting a popular style or a premium for the “Vogue” brand.

Then I found a review at Sew Weekly by Mena Trott who had made the dress up – here’s a photo she posted. She called it the “Where’s my coke, Lester?” dress. You can see she’s made the neckline more demure, reducing the decolletage.

IMG_9673
Photo copyright Mena Trott.

Mena made it up in a heavy polyester, which didn’t hang as well as she would have liked. Perhaps she’ll try again in a lighter fabric? As anyone who sews can attest, the success generally depends on what fabric you choose – I’ve made that mistake many times, especially with trousers so perhaps that’s why I don’t wear them? It’s a good idea to follow the fabric suggestions on the pattern packet.

In another review Elona said…”I’ve made this one, and would like to note that with that decolletage and done up in a light, drapy fabric, it can be a stunning dressing gown, if you don’t have kids around the house.”

Gosh, how did we ever cope without the internet and all the information available?

Then I found an enthusiastic review by Urban Rustic who was fortunate enough to score some nice silk crepe at an op shop – perfect! Here’s the result:

Urban Rustic
Marvellous! Photo copyright Urban Rustic.

If that wasn’t enough, I found a pic of my favourite ’60s model, Jean Shrimpton wearing it in a David Bailey photo.

Jean Shrimpton

I think that’s twice in one week Miss Shrimpton has appeared in my blog. Photo copyright David Bailey, 1970. Mr Bailey was engaged to Jean in 1964, and together they produced some wonderful fashion shots.

If you’d like to try your hand at your own Vogue dress, the pattern is now available in the webshop: unless I decide to try it myself, of course!


29
Nov
2013
Posted by Nicole in 1960s, 1970s, Designers, Vintage 101 5 Comments

Today I’ve been looking into a new outfit, that’s just gone online – this “two piece dress” or top and skirt set by Melbourne designer Noeleen King.

circa_vintage_webshop_269_1

Noeleen was born in Ireland about 1933 and first learnt her trade under fashion designer Sybill Connolly. After migrating to Australia in the mid ’50s, she worked as a salegirl for five years before setting up her own label in Flinders Lane making “street dresses” with a small workroom and three machinists.

The following year she started making evening and cocktail wear, which sold better. True success came to her after five years, in 1965. With her Vidal Sassoon Eton crop hairstyle and lashings of mascara, her style was very young and hip. She was compared to Norma Tullo in importance for the era.

Noeleen and models Aus Womens Weekly 1965
Noeleen and models, Australian Women’s Weekly 1965.

Noeleen’s label primarily produced clothes she wanted to wear herself, and was described as “Medieval Mod”. Her customers were mostly teenagers and women in their early 20s – the largest size she stocked was SSW (Small, small woman, roughly equivalent to a modern size 8!). You can see the medieval influence in the outfit above, and sure enough, the size is “XXSSW” – equivalent to a modern 4 but don’t worry, we replaced the elastic in the tiny waist (it had deteriorated) now making it a size 8. It’s a very unusual style, with it’s double puffed, Renaissance style sleeves.

Aus Womens Weekly 1966
Jean Shrimpton in Noeleen King, Australian Women’s Weekly 1966.

Mary Quant was a friend and fan of Noeleen’s designs, and authorised Noeleen to produce her designs in Australia, under licence. The Vintage Fashion Guild have a copy of the Mary Quant/Noeleen King label if you’d like to see it.

Noeleen’s skirts came in three lengths: day (just above the knee), cafe (mid calf) and evening (touching the instep) – another way of saying “mini, midi and maxi”. The one above must be “evening length”. The long maxi skirt with a wide ruffle to the hem is quite fashion forward – this style was influenced by the ’40s fashions and became very popular in the mid ’70s.

nicole-de-la-marge-in-printed-cotton-dress-with-tiered-collar-by-noeleen-king-photo-by-norman-eales-may-1965-b
Nicole de la Marge in printed cotton dress with tiered collar by Noeleen King, photo by Norman Eales, May 1965 Photo source here.

In 1965 Noeleen was shipping her designs to the US and the UK from her factory of 80 machinists in the basement of 45 Flinders Lane and warehouse at 23 Lincoln Square South, Carlton. She lived in a South Yarra maisonette with her husband Ron (also her production manager).

Aus Womens Weekly 1965
The Australian Women’s Weekly 1965

Aus Womens Weekly 1969
The Australian Women’s Weekly 1969

Noeleen King label late '60s
Noeleen King label from the late 1960s.

Noeleen’s old factory in Flinders Lane is now a theatre and earlier this year a production was staged there about Noeleen’s life and label! I’m not sure when the label ceased, but I suspect it was the late ’70s – certainly, I can’t find any references to the company or fashions after then.

Thank you, Noeleen, I’ll be looking out for more of your beautiful fashions from the ’60s and ’70s.


Unless stated otherwise, all content © Circa Vintage Clothing 2004-2014. ABN 37 840 548 574.