3
Oct
2014
Posted by Nicole in 1930s, Calendar 1 Comment

Hi all,

I hope you have the next “Strictly Vintage” market in your diaries – it’s a bargain $5 entry for some of the best vintage traders around, in the beautiful Deco surrounds of the Northcote Town Hall – plus I’m presenting a free talk on 1930s ladies fashions!

What: The Strictly Vintage market
When: Sunday 30th November, 10am to 5pm (12pm for the talk on 1930s ladies fashions)
Where: Northcote Town Hall, top of Ruckers Hill, High St, Northcote. Tram out the front, Merri and Westgarth train stations nearby.
Cost: $5
More information at the Strictly Vintage Facebook page. – See here.

My new book “Style is Eternal” should be available and I’ll be signing copies – here’s one of my favourite lace ’30s evening gowns, one of the many pieces I’ll be talking about on the day – modelled by St Clare. This lovely gown is made of spiderweb lace, sewn with iridescent blue gelatine sequins.

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There are still some stalls available – if you’re interested in joining us, please contact Rina at Take 2 Markets. It promises to be a wonderful day!


2
Oct
2014
Posted by Nicole in Contest, Film, Style icon 13 Comments

The other night we were treated to the new documentary “Advanced Style” based on the New York blog.

From the official site:
Advanced Style examines the lives of seven unique New Yorkers whose eclectic personal style and vital spirit have guided their approach to aging. Based on Ari Seth Cohen’s famed blog of the same name, this film paints intimate and colorful portraits of independent, stylish women aged 62 to 95 who are challenging conventional ideas about beauty, aging, and Western’s culture’s increasing obsession with youth.

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It’s an engaging and life affirming film about some very interesting women and how they choose to dress.

Their age is irrelevant though: these are creative people who like to express themselves, and have fun with their look. For them, it’s not about “challenging…ideas about beauty”, it’s about enjoying life.

I liked Joyce Carpati’s attitude: “I never wanted to look young. I wanted to look great.” I’m sure she didn’t wait to reach age 80 before looking fabulous, it’s a way of life for her: an elegant and classic style, she resembles an aristocratic ballet director. Inspirational. She’s like the glamourous grandmother of your dreams – ladies like Joyce used to run finishing schools for young ladies but now thanks to the internet she can inspire us all.

It’s only the young that are surprised that older people can be interesting and stylish – we get so hung up on age, but you are who you are throughout your life, only more so as you get older. You’ve had more time to experiment, to discover yourself and your strengths. You’re less scared (hopefully) of the slings and arrows of others shallow opinions.

Those who are over sixty remember what it was like to dress in the age of hats and gloves, and knew better how to put an outfit together, to dress for your figure and make the most of accessories. Perhaps they’re better educated, well travelled and have developed more life skills purely from having more time to do so?

Some of the ladies in this film are in their prime, and far too young (I thought) to be “Advanced” but the title is a respectful one, even if Ari himself seems to feel as if old age is something that happens to other people. I think it’s easy, when you’re young to feel that there’s a lot of distance between you and your elders but time passes much more quickly than you expect (or would like) and it happens to all of us, assuming we’re fortunate to live that long.

The stars of “Advanced Style” are a reminder that life goes on, and can be as rich as you wish it – they’re a diverse bunch and part of the fun for me was seeing how different they are, and how put together into a group, they’re no more likely to get along than any other bunch of strangers but they share a joy of fashion, a love of colour and texture and are happy to invite us into their world.

Madman have sent me five double passes, valid at most cinemas screening the film around Australia – to win one, please leave a comment about the older woman who inspires you the most – she can be any age, because really, I believe that style is not about age at all, but an attitude. Entries close Saturday midnight and winners will be chosen at random – good luck!

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The stars of “Advanced Style” at the New York premier, photo reproduced courtesy “Advanced Style” blog.


24
Sep
2014
Posted by Nicole in Contest 5 Comments

Last night I hosted a wonderful, intimate event at Circa – a book launch for Lorelei Vashti’s new book “Dress, Memory”.

From publisher Allen and Unwin: “Dress, Memory…is a charming coming-of-age memoir in which every dress tells a story. As we grow older, how do we know what to let go of and what to keep?

Lorelei started collecting dresses in her twenties and found that every time she wore one it became more significant to her. From falling in love for the first time to playing in a band, from starting a career to moving overseas, every dress soon had a memory stitched into it, and she became as attached to each one as if they were the events and people themselves.

But what happens when the wardrobe gets full? Should you let go of the dresses you’ve outgrown, or try to hold on to them forever?

Dress, Memory is about a decade in dresses. Perceptive and poignant, humorous and heartwarming, it’s the story of growing up and growing into yourself. It’s about trying things on until you find the perfect fit.”

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We chatted about our dresses and the stories they tell – and then Lorelei gave me a book for a lucky reader to win! See below for details.

Now here are some pics from last night.

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Lorelei and her daughter Winnifred (who also wore a beautiful vintage frock!)

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Jessie from Alternative Walking Tours, Clem Bastow and Sarah Trotter from Hearth.

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Alice Edgeley and Hanna Tusler from Tusler Bags.

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Marianne from Esme and the Laneway (my favourite fashion blog).

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Magdalena and Kitty. In the background you can see Lorelei’s ’30s frock that she’s wearing on the book cover.

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Madeleine Adore – so nice to see you again Madeleine and your minty dress looks great with your red hair!

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Lorelei and I discussing the finer points of frocks. Photo by Clem Bastow.

This event was so fun, and it was great to chat with everyone – might have to steal your idea Lorelei and do my own book launch at Circa when “Style is Eternal” comes out in December.

If you’d like to win your own copy of Lorelei’s wonderful book, please leave a comment about one of your dresses and a favourite memory – winner will be chosen at random and entries closes this Saturday at midnight. Good luck!


13
Sep
2014
Posted by Nicole in 1950s, 1960s, 1970s, Style icon 1 Comment

Over the last decade I’ve noticed a worrying trend – dressing down to travel.

Now, I don’t know about you but I don’t get to travel enough and it’s always a treat.

Whether it’s for work or pleasure, the way you dress affects how you feel and how you’re treated. I get that you’d like to feel comfortable, but there’s no reason why casual clothes have to be as ugly and unflattering as tracksuits or pyjamas, items which are best kept for private spaces, not public ones.

An article in Slate by J. Bryan Lowder called “Take a One-Way Trip From Tatty to Natty” has the following to say:

When we dress well for travel, we are not only making ourselves look good; we’re also signaling that we are invested in making this shared experience pleasant for everyone around us. Think of it as a kind of sartorial social contract: Honor it and your minor efforts make transit a more pleasing activity; break it, and reveal your misanthropic narcissism to, quite literally, the world. What else to call putting one’s own base comforts above the comfort of all?

Here’s some inspiration from Mad Men – now wouldn’t it brighten your day to arrive at the airport to be greeted with fellow travellers dressed so boldly? Sit me next to any of those people please.

Made Men, season seven

Back in the real world, let’s look at what Jane Birkin and Serge Gainsbourg wore for a flight in 1968.

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Jane looks relaxed in a short, knit dress with over the knee socks and a long coat over the top. Gold hoop ear rings and simple and fresh hair and make up – her grooming is good, her style comfortable and yet smart, showing off her best feature (thighs to die for). I’m sure she has stylish low-heeled shoes, just out of frame.

Not to be outdone, Serge has a loose suit, open necked shirt and is that a cravat I see? Lace up oxford style brogues are vastly superior to sneakers and look infinitely better whilst not relinquishing much comfort.

They’re both dressed in quality clothes that are versatile as well as photogenic. Upon arrival, they could head straight to an art gallery or cocktail bar. This is an easy look for all of us with a little thought. This look, although from almost fifty years ago still looks pretty good don’t you think?

Similar techniques are favoured in these celebrity photos from the ’50s to the ’70s – comfortable but smart clothes, lowish heels, a jacket, coat or cardigan for warmth in air conditioned cabins and good grooming and accessories.

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Roger Vadim and Jane Fonda in 1965. No wonder he fancies her.

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Brigitte Bardot in 1966. Knits are perfect for travel – I’d have my camera out too if more travellers dressed like BB.

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Richard Burton and Elizabeth Taylor in 1966. Luxury glamour – Liz could have anything under that fur coat, even a tracksuit but somehow I doubt it.

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Catherine Deneuve in 1961 – scarves are the ultimate in travel accessories, versatile and fold up in your bag.

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Faye Dunaway in 1967. Product placement, vintage style.

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Grace Kelly in 1950. The perfect coat for travelling, could double as a blanket on cold flights.

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Jackie Kennedy in 1966. Elegant white alaskine (silk and wool) coatdress with bracelet length sleeves.

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Mick Jagger and Marianne Faithfull in 1969. I love her faux-Victorian style button boots.

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Jerry Hall in 1979 in hand-knitted cardigan and high waisted jeans. A concord flight tag makes a good lux accessory on her overnight bag.

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Jean Shrimpton in 1966 – just beautiful. Surely someone will offer to carry her suitcase?

All photos by Getty - image source here, where you will find more glamour airport fashion.


11
Sep
2014
Posted by Nicole in 1950s, 1960s, Contest, Film, Shop talk, Television 15 Comments

Over the last ten years, there’s a long list of film, theatre and TV productions that have utilised costumes and props from Circa. It’s one of the aspects of my work that pleases me the most – contributing in a small way to creative projects.

Since moving to the city in 2012 and focusing more on the webshop, this part of my business has increased a lot and I like to think that I’m making it easier for costumers around the country to find what they’re looking for. Here are a couple of recent works.

Anna in “A Place to Call Home” wore one of Circa’s ’50s gowns for her wedding.

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Image source, reproduced courtesy Channel Seven.

The locally made science fiction/time traveller film “Predestination” featured many of our original pieces including several ’60s dresses in this scene.

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Image Source.

Costume Designer Wendy Cork was kind enough to name check Circa as a source in this interview about costuming the film – thanks Wendy!

Now I have something for you – we currently have two-for-one tickets to see the new Woody Allen film “Magic in the Moonlight”, set in 1920s south of France (and believe me, the eye candy is wonderful. It almost makes me miss summer). I’m including them in webshop orders but you can pick them up in the shop too.

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Magic in the Moonlight with Colin Firth and Emma Stone.

Also, we have four double passes to the new Nick Cave film “20,000 Days on Earth”. If you’d like to win one, leave a comment on this blog post about your favourite Nick Cave, Bad Seeds, Birthday Party or Boys Next Door track. Contest closes midnight Saturday night, and winners will be chosen at random. Good luck!

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Image Source.

The shop will be closed next week so I can have a short break, and then I will be expanding the shop trading hours to Monday to Friday, 10am to 5.30pm.

You’re welcome to come and visit me any time during these hours for browsing but I encourage appointments if you’re making a special trip or require advice, as I’ll need to fit all my other commitments into them and will sometimes be closed.

This change will mean that I can list more items online, with a wider variety including more accessories and menswear. Anything purchased online can be returned for a refund for any reason, so there’s no risk if you can’t come and try it on.

My book on demystifying fashion, “Style is Eternal” is now available for pre-order from Melbourne University Publishing at a 10% discount and will be released on December 1st. Can’t wait! Hopefully there will be a book launch.

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Don’t forget to leave a comment so you can see the Nick Cave film!


5
Sep
2014
Posted by Nicole in Bridal, Calendar, Exhibitions 11 Comments

Please accept my apologies for neglecting to share some photos taken at the opening of this wonderful new National Trust exhibition. This exhibition opened a while ago, and closes at the end of this month but hopefully it’s not too late to go and see it now.

From the site:
The collection spans over 200 years of fashion, including pieces from the world-leading designers such as Valentino for Princess Marie Chantal of Greece. A mini retrospect of leading Australian designers – Akira Isogawa and Collette Dinnigan will showcase their fashion career.

Celebrity gowns include dresses designed for Jennifer Hawkins (Maticevski) and Kyly Clarke (Alex Perry) to film and television pieces worn by Kylie Minogue (as Charlene in Neighbours) to Kate Winslet, Gwyneth Paltrow and Meryl Streep.

What: Love, Desire, Riches – The Fashion of Weddings exhibition
When: 1st July until 30th September 2014, 10am to 4pm each day
Where:Rippon Lea, 192 Hotham St, Rippon Lea
Cost: between $4 -$15.
More information: at the website.

You can see me here at the opening with Tim and Alison Waters.

Tim, Alison, NJPhoto courtesy the National Trust.

More importantly, here are some pics from the exhibition itself. Firstly a few words.
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I’m always felt a little torn about wedding gown exhibitions: bridal fashions change much more slowly than other types of dress and often tend to the more conservative, especially before the ’90s. There was this idea about the virtuous woman, who was modest and reflected her social class, or the class she was marrying into. The results can be a little dull.

When you put older gowns up against their contemporaries, as is done here, there can be a bit of a clash – modern brides often like a sexier, more glamorous movie star, red carpet look.

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Here we also have several celebrity gowns and – a highlight for me – some choice film wedding costumes. There’s nothing like seeing something that you’ve only seen on screen for a few minutes in a long ago scene, up close where you can walk around it and look at that intriguing detail.

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It’s also a great opportunity to ooh and aah over how tiny the Victorian waistlines were. One in particular looks like you could put your hands around her waist. Much beauty too. Plus reminders that wedding gowns weren’t always white.

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One room is dedicated to the darker side of weddings with the banquet table set up for Miss Havisham’s cobwebbed feast and no fewer than three film costumes for the Dickens character. I appreciated the room: it gave light and shade to the fantasies elsewhere.

Upstairs is a room dedicated to the art of couture sewing, with an Akira bridal gown hand made from paper patterns, and vintage sewing tools like enormous scissors and antique mannequins. It’s a nice reminder of how much goes into creating the once-worn confections.

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I thought the setting particular apt, as weddings are personal and intimate affairs, celebrating the love of two people – Rippon Lea as both domestic and wedding venue resonated with the gowns more than a stark art gallery does. The older garments looked particularly at home amongst the sumptuous interiors.

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The men were not forgotten, with a room dedicated to manly attire appropriate for the occasion.

“Love, Desire, Riches” closes at the end of the month. I hope you can see it. If you’d like tickets, the National Trust have offered five double passes – to win one, please leave a comment about your favourite wedding gown – perhaps a famous one from history, cinema or even your own. Winners will be chosen at random and entries close Monday midnight. Good luck!

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29
Aug
2014
Posted by Nicole in 1960s, Calendar, Talk

Hi all,

I’ve got a talk coming up on ’60s fashion, as part of the “Polyester and Pantyhose” exhibition now on. It’s a free event and includes afternoon tea. I’ll be bringing some favourite pieces from my private collection as well as a sneak peak of some styles that will be featured in my upcoming book “Style is Eternal” (out December 1st). There will also be an opportunity to see the exhibition after the talk.

What: Talk on 1960s Australian ladieswear and afternoon tea.
When: Tuesday 9 September, 2pm
Where: The Gallery, Bayside Arts and Cultural Centre, Brighton Town Hall, cnr Carpenter and Wilson Streets, Brighton.
Cost: free but bookings required as limited numbers available – phone 9592 0291
For more information see here: the Bayside council site.

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A photo from the exhibition, reproduced courtesy Bayside council.


29
Aug
2014
Posted by Nicole in 1900s, Australian Fashion, Calendar, Exhibitions

Sydney people should look out for a new exhibition on early 20th century fashions, opening soon. It presents a rare opportunity to see Australian Edwardian and ‘teens era fashions.

From fine lacy lawn tea gowns & elaborate beaded opulence to austere military & service garments, come and see an eclectic and beautiful display of fine Edwardian & War time Fashion, with a slice of Australian style.

This exhibition takes form as a collaboration between the National Trust Costume and Textiles Collection and the private collection of Glennis Murphy – Over the Top Vintage, along with items from other collections and collectors, including Australian Military Specialist Brad Manera, Cavalcade of History and Fashion, NSW Lancers Memorial Museum, The Kings School and family mementos from Old Government House Volunteers.

The exhibition runs as part of NSW History Week, marking the centenary of WW1. Circa Vintage has loaned an Edwardian lace up corset.

What: Clothing The People: Edwardian and Wartime Fashion Exhibition
When: 5th September – 6th October 2014, Open 10am to 4pm Tuesday to Sunday.
Where:Old Government House, Parramatta Park/Pitt St, Parramatta NSW 2150
For ticket prices and more info please see the official site.

Complementing the exhibition, there will be two specialist talks which will take place on 6 September. ‘Military Dress’ by Brad Manera and ‘Edwardian Ladies Fashion’ by Eleanor Keene, Curator. See the website for details.

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Clothing the people 2

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Photo credits: the National Trust NSW.


13
Aug
2014
Posted by Nicole in 1940s, Architecture, Style icon 1 Comment

In my ideal world, I would live at the Dakota.

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Archival image from Wikipedia, circa 1890.

Built in 1884, the seven story Victorian European style building graces New York’s upper West Side with bohemian glamour.

Originally there were 65 spacious apartments over seven floors, featuring between 4 and 20 rooms each. Above, under the rooftops were smaller rooms for servants. On the ground floor there was a large dining room where residents could either eat, or have meals sent up to their rooms via dumb waiters. Next door was a large stables (later garage) for the families who called it home.

From Wikipedia:
The general layout of the apartments is in the French style of the period, with all major rooms not only connected to each other, in enfilade, in the traditional way, but also accessible from a hall or corridor, an arrangement that allows a natural migration for guests from one room to another, especially on festive occasions, yet gives service staff discreet separate circulation patterns that offer service access to the main rooms. The principal rooms, such as parlors or the master bedroom, face the street, while the dining room, kitchen, and other auxiliary rooms are oriented toward the courtyard.

Many of the ceilings are 14 feet high (4.3m) and some of the drawing rooms were 49 feet long (15 m)!

My neighbours in the building are all creative people, including most famously John Lennon and Yoko Ono, but also Judy Garland, Boris Karloff, Lilian Gish, Rudolf Nureyev, Gilda Radna, Leonard Bernstein, Bono, Paul Simon, Rosemary Clooney and Lauren Bacall. Of course, everyone interesting who has ever lived there, would still be there regardless of time or events.

Lauren

Vale Lauren – a remarkable actress, one of the greats from the Golden Era of Hollywood. You will always be my favourite ’40s movie star.

Here’s a pic of Lauren in her Dakota apartment – photo from Vanity Fair. She’s just passed away, aged 89. She chose an excellent home.

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I first discovered the Dakota in the Polanski film “Rosemary’s Baby” (1968). The camera pans over Manhattan, Central Park and the Dakota rooftop during the opening credits and I always tune in for this wonderful view –


Click here to view if you’re reading this via email.

Here’s a shot of it covered in snow (from Wikipedia).

Dakota under snow - Wikipedia

The interiors for the film were shot in a studio but for me, this is what I expect the Dakota to look like inside – lots of dark wood and space. Hopefully a little more furniture but sacrifices must be made for a wonderful abode.

rosemarys-baby

Of course, hopefully not the sort of sacrifices that Rosemary and her husband make in the film, but I understand their devotion.

Thanks to the wonders of the internet and the enthusiasm real estate agents have for selling their properties, I can offer you some actual interior shots from an assortment of apartments – these all come from Curbed, which has a lot of information on the Dakota.

Over the years the original apartments have been split up and subdivided, and large rooms converted into multiple smaller ones – aided no doubt by all the entrances off hallways and interconnecting doors – and additional bathrooms were inserted but beneath the differing tastes in interior decoration and updated floor plans, you can see the bones of this incredible and unique building.

Let’s go inside….
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I once saw an enormous book with plans for the building, including layouts for all of the floors – they’re much changed of course, but it would be wonderful to see how it was and how it’s been altered over the years. If I ever find it again, I’ll have to buy it.

Here’s the original seventh floor:

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And here’s one of the modern day apartments: you can see how some of the large rooms have been turned into multiple smaller ones.

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When I went to New York, I was surprised at how small the building is, as it looms large in my imagination. It’s incredible though and you can’t fault the location opposite Central Park. I’m unlikely to be amongst the fortunate to call it home – even supposing that I could afford it, you also have to be approved by the board, but one day, perhaps, I’ll have a peek inside.

If you’re interested in the history of this building, I recommend the book “Life at the Dakota” by Stephen Birmingham, an excellent read. There are lots of great exterior photos at this site too.


9
Aug
2014
Posted by Nicole in 1940s, 1950s, Vintage 101 1 Comment

One of the questions I most frequently encounter is that of vintage versus reproduction fashion.

Now, as we know – real vintage is an authentic creation from a previous era. Reproduction is modern, brand new fashion, usually mass-produced and based on the style of a previous era. It can be a little confusing these days as some (contemporary) designers call their wares “vintage” when really they’re repros, and that with sufficient passing of time, the repros themselves become vintage.

From the in-box:

What do you think about modern companies reproducing vintage textiles? I just sold two excellent print dresses to the lady who runs a popular fashion label and am somewhat concerned/intrigued about the copyright of such images. I wonder if it is similar to book copyright dissolving 50-years after the author’s death. Do you know if designs go into the public domain?

Fashion is considered utilitarian and not subject to copyright except for in exceptional circumstances where a designer can prove that they have created a new innovation. Then they need to spend the time and money to obtain legal protection, whereupon they can defend their design from copyists. This is a fraught process and rarely undertaken (much to the frustration of fashion designers everywhere). It also offers even less protection in the modern world thanks to our global internet driven trade, where what happens in other countries is mostly beyond your control.

It’s almost as if you know you’re succeeding as a designer if someone, somewhere is reproducing your designs, claiming credit for them and selling them for less money (probably at a lesser quality), perhaps even using your images. Awful, isn’t it? Etsy in particular, is trawled by the unethical and considered a showroom for stealing other’s creativity.

There are advantages to the lack of legal protections though, and if you’re interested I encourage you to view this excellent TED talk by Johanna Blakely, which explains it in much greater detail.


Note: if you’re reading this on email, click here to see the video.

Now what of the actual reproductions themselves and how do they compare to real vintage? There are two types of reproductions: the true reproductions and the inspirations.

True Reproductions are where a designer takes an original vintage piece and copies it – generally this means that the design will be very close to the original with small concessions to a modern wearer, for example, shorter skirt length or more comfortable fit.

More noticeably, there will be differences in fabric and construction – for example, here is a ’50s style dress made by J.Peterman.

JPeterman

Whilst this dress faithfully reproduces the vintage print, fabric and style, the skirt is noticeably shorter and it features a centre back invisible zipper and a plain fabric belt – the original would have had a side or centre back metal zipper and the belt would have been made of the same print. The faux-wrap may also be a modern design concession, as you rarely see this in ’50s day dresses (more often in evening wear).

Here’s a dress available through local label Vicious Venus – based on Hawaiian sarong dresses of the ’40s.

ViciousVenus

It looks very authentic but it’s slightly shorter than an original and the “stretch cotton sateen” is a cotton and Spandex mix to give it a little stretch, whereas the ’40s version would be soft cottony rayon like this one.

Another good example of a reproduction label is Heyday and here is vintage fashion blogger Fleur deGuerre modelling a ’40s style dress.

Heyday

Heyday take their vintage seriously and have done a great job of faithfully reproducing this dress including the gingham fabric, vintage style buttons and ric rac. When it was introduced Fleur described how the authentic style was tweaked slightly for modern fit – not that you can tell, it looks very authentic.

I haven’t seen this dress in person but I suspect it would offer a challenge to someone trying to determine if it was real ’40s or not. Thankfully it will have modern labels which will include sizing and care information. If those were removed you could look to modern construction, with overlocking, polyester thread and modern plastic buttons. The seams and hem allowance probably won’t be as generous its WW2 original. If you want to get really finicky, the quality of the gingham also won’t be as good as the earlier version, and may crease a little more (earlier cottons tend to be thicker and more robust) – you can see it’s a little sheer against the sun too, suggesting lightness. It would definitely pass muster for your recreation event, especially if you accessorise it well. Bonus points for UK manufacture too.

Now we have the “vintage inspirations”, which – let’s face it – are almost all fashion out there because thanks to the cycle of fashion, designers are constantly dipping into the past for something fresh.

Designers like to design, and (with the exception of the faithful recreations like those above) generally take something that has been done before and give it a twist, modernise or personalise it. So you see combinations of elements from different eras.

Most vintage reproduction labels fall into this category because although they might call their dresses “1940s” or “1950s”, our grandmothers wouldn’t have recognised them. They also feature modern construction techniques, fabrics and detailing.

Here’s a dress from Stop Staring, worn by fashion blogger Forever Amber – the sweetheart neckline hints at the ’40s whilst the fitted, wiggle shape is a ’50s design. Polka dots and the pale blue contribute to the ’50s look too. The hemline is early ’60s and the cap sleeves are modern.

Stop Staring

It’s a darling, but very different to real vintage – it also features a modern style keyhole cutout back and probably a nylon zipper and no seam allowances.

Even more improbable as real vintage, are dresses like this cutie from Faster Pussycat.

Faster Pussycat

A ’50s style dress with extra short skirt and centre front faux buttons, it includes a ’40s style elastic shirring waistband and is made of chiffon (probably easy care polyester). The real giveaway to its modern origin is the incredible Mexican-inspired print: cameos with zombie skulls, roses and black widow spiders.

This is one of the many things I love about vintage: seeing how it is reinvented and is constantly inspiring new things. We live in the modern world and we’re fortunate in that we can pick and choose what we want from the past.

Repro fashion comes in a range of sizes, probably colours and perhaps fabrics and requires less care to look after than true vintage, which offers better quality, unique fabrics and detailing as well as that lovely thrill of knowing that there’s probably only one of your item and you never need worry about walking into a party to see someone wearing your frock. Also, it’s the greenest of all fashion: more win.

Regardless of whether you’re wearing authentic vintage, vintage reproduction or vintage inspired, the style is only one component – look out for good quality, as cheaply made fashions won’t look good or last the distance.

Personally, I love vintage, real vintage of the sort that was made a long time ago and looked after properly, you’ll still be wearing and appreciating for many years to come. Of course!


Unless stated otherwise, all content © Circa Vintage Clothing 2004-2014. ABN 37 840 548 574.