31
Dec
2014
Posted by Nicole in Shop talk 1 Comment

It’s been quite a year here at Circa – the highlight was my second book “Style is Eternal”, which was released to a great response – it was simply wonderful on Christmas morning to think that many people would be unwrapping a copy of my book and enjoying it!

Here’s a quote from a reader:
“The book is beautifully illustrated with gorgeous colour images…it will guide you…it will inspire you! So if you love fashion, or just want to whip your wardrobe into shape, I can highly recommend this book…it will become your fashion bible!”
Thank you Sarah from Zinc Moon blog.

In particular, the book has been warmly received by those who cherish my first book “Love Vintage” which is great. I like to think that the two books are sitting next to each other on bookshelves around the country, as they are on mine.

Most importantly, I’d like to thank everyone who has supported my vintage shop Circa over the last year: who bought an item online or came to see me at the shop because Circa is the foundation of all that I do.

Circa provides me a home away from home, filled with many of my favourite things and a lovely place to work. A desk to write and needles with which to sew. It funds the research and writing that I do, and allows me the freedom to offer specialised advice to all who come seeking it.

Without your support I wouldn’t be able to pursue my passion and share my knowledge.

I wish you all a wonderful 2015 and in the words of Mae West: “Too much of a good thing can be wonderful!”

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See you next year xxx

Circa is open throughout the festive season, only closed for public holidays. Here are some vintage New Year’s images that I’ve found that you might like – and I like the idea that all of these old images were once fresh and new, and looking forward to a new year that for us is now far in the past.


24
Dec
2014
Posted by Nicole in General, Vintage 101, Vintage Fabric 4 Comments

More than seven years and 620 blog posts later, I think it could be time to write an informative blog post for those starting out in vintage – what to look for, and how to date fashion.

Here’s the disclaimer:
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There is an unlimited amount of information you can know on this topic. It’s been my focus for almost 35 years and I still find items that give me pause for thought. That’s a big part of why I love it: you could never be bored with vintage fashion, there is so much to see and learn. What I hope to offer is a solid starting point for you to explore from.
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Silk devore’ velvet 1920s opera jacket modelled by St Clare.

Identifying vintage is like looking at a jigsaw puzzle and putting the pieces together in the right way to come to the most likely conclusion about what it is. There are a few different elements to consider and weight needs to be given to each:

1 – Fabric
2 – Construction
3 – Style
4 – Detailing (if any)
5 – Labels (if any)
6 – Openings and Fastenings (if any)

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Wool lace featured in an early 1960s afternoon coat, modelled by Becky Lou.

General notes on dating items:
– I always date items as the most recent they could be, because the likelihood is towards recent over older. Older garments have had more time to wear out or be thrown away and so rarity increases.

– Certainties are rare in fashion so they always outweigh other factors.

– Never rely on a seller’s opinion of a date, not even if she wore it “back in the day” or is an expert. There’s an enormous quantity of mis-dated or even fraudulent vintage available and it’s best to increase your knowledge so you can feel confident of your own opinion. This is particularly important for expensive items. If in doubt, ask questions or seek a second opinion.

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Cotton with machine applied soutache cording and pin-tucking, from a 1950s day dress.

1 – Fabric.
Vintage fabric is one of the best things about vintage fashion: often luxury materials are used that are sought after and expensive. Many fabrics aren’t even made any more. Your enjoyment wearing it will be dictated to a large degree by how nice the material is.

Here’s where technology is important – when a fabric was invented or introduced is a certainty. For example, if nylon wasn’t used until ’47, then that cute little nylon ’20s dress is not going to be a real ’20s dress (so it should be priced accordingly). Likewise a Victorian dress made of polyester must be a more modern revival style.

Pay particular attention to fabric when you acquire an item because if you want to wear it, or invest in it as a collectable it is imperative than the condition be good.

Sometimes in vintage you will find “deadstock” or “new old stock” – these are vintage pieces that have not been worn. They’re more sought after and collectable but their condition reflects their storage, not their wear, and it’s not uncommon for these items to show stains, rips and other deterioration.

Any deterioration can provide clues to age but more importantly, diminish the value and life of the garment. Think carefully before buying anything that either needs major work, or can not be repaired. If you don’t sew, you might like to consider every missing button or stitch as well, as it can get costly to replace and repair these items if you’re paying someone else.

Don’t take the sellers word for it when they say “an easy fix” because they often lack the skill and experience to know what’s involved and leave it up to you to take the risk.

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Hand beaded and embroidered alaskine (silk and wool mix) evening dress from the 1960s.

On the other hand, if you’re okay with flaws (or handy with a needle and thread) you can pick up some serious bargains because a high proportion of vintage is damaged, and should be priced significantly cheaper for it.

Every fabric is comprised of the fibre (or textile) and the weave (what the fibre is made into). For example, silk satin – silk is the fibre and satin is the weave, so you can also get polyester satin and rayon satin.

An effective way to test for fabric composition is to (carefully) burn a snippet – Instructions and results can be found at the Vintage Fashion Guild.

Another way is to build up your knowledge through touching fabrics and looking at the labels, but as many fabrics are mixes of fibres, the burn test will provide more accurate results.

Here’s a quick low down on fibre types:

Natural fibres (cottons, wools, silks, rubber, linens, leathers, furs etc)
Available during any time period, although the weaves vary with fashion and can help with dating eg, silk shantung had a real moment in the early ’60s especially in teal and orange colours.

Silk organza was popular in the ’50s. Silk crepe was a staple of ’30s dinner dresses, and silk chiffon often found in ’20s beaded evening dresses.

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Silk organza and rayon lace from an early 1950s party dress

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Cotton lace from a late 1940s fitted dress.

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Printed rubber embossed with a jacquard texture, from a 1950s raincoat

Note that natural fibres are the most comfortable to wear and easy to restore, but are more expensive to buy, especially new.

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Silk satin with hand beaded and sequinned design, from a 1960s cheong sam dress.

Man-made fibres (rayons and viscoses)
Invented in the late Victorian era as “artificial silk” or “art silk”, rayon (also called viscose, especially in the UK) developed into a wide range of natural fibre fabric imitators in the ’30s, when they were particularly popular during the Great Depression and later during WW2. Eg, faux linen, faux silk.

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Rayon lace and tulle, from a 1930s lace blouse.

Pre ’50s rayons have a different composition than post ’50s rayons and require hand-washing (or in the case of crepe, dry cleaning). Rayons mirror the nice qualities of natural fibres and you can soak out stains – unless they’re crepe, which will shrink and rip – but lack their strenth so be gentle especially if they’re very old.

They’re beautiful fabrics though, and many of us seek them out.

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Rayon crepe from a 1930s tea gown – modelled by Kelly Ann.

Underarm protectors (small crescent shaped shields that are affixed to the interior and washed between uses, available from haberdashers) are recommended to best preserve the underarms, which rip when they’ve absorbed perspiration. Swing dancers take note please!

Rayons are named for the slight sheen their fibres can produce, although it’s hard to see in some weaves.

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Rayon shantung and guipure lace from an early 1960s dress ensemble set.

Synthetic fibres (nylons, polyesters, polyamids, lycras etc)
Nylon first appeared as a silk substitute in the late ’30s for hosiery and was developed into fashion fabrics for clothes post WW2 (1947 was when the industry got back into the swing).


I’ll confess that I originally dated this dress as late ’30s but a burn test revealed its late ’40s origins.

Polyesters were introduced into ladieswear in the ’50s and quickly become popular in the U.S.A. but were rarely used in Australia until the next decade when they really took off.

Until the mid ’60s each factory used its own trademarked name for the fibre: Dacron (an early acrylic which imitates wool), Terylene, Crimplene….if you find a fabric name on a label you don’t recognise, it’s likely to be a type of polyester, the umbrella term that was introduced in the ’60s.

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Metallic and synthetic brocade evening gown with fins, early 1960s.

There is an issue with early synthetics in that they’re prone to breaking down, especially when in sponge forms, linings and paddings like bras and swimwear, hats and furs. I recommend my blog post on Devil Dust - the grainy red or brownish-orange coloured residue that can form is unpleasant and irreversible. If your garment shows any sign of this effect, tread with caution. Many sensational ’60s frocks have been lost to this issue, at all levels of quality. I can only hope that they’ve solved the problem or we’ll all be drowning in Devil Dust in a few decades.

In recent years we also see polyamids. Most modern garments are made of synthetics: they’re generally robust but prone to pilling and hard to remove oil-based stains. From an investment point of view, they don’t hold their value as well as natural fibres or early man-made fibres either. It’s no secret that I prefer natural fibres.

Synthetics feel warmer to the touch than natural or man-made materials, but can otherwise imitate other fibres. Modern synthetics can be quite luxurious too: they’ve come a long way from Crimplene.

More on the other topics – Construction, Style, Detailing, Labels and Openings and Fastenings – soon!

Here are some useful links:
– If you’d like to look at more specific fabric deterioration topics like shattering, dry rot and iron mordant please check out my series of Vintage 101 posts.

– If you’d like to know more about particular fabrics and how to identify them, please see the Vintage Fashion Guild’s excellent Fabric Resource.

Lucas Nyaloc


18
Dec
2014
Posted by Nicole in 2000s

As my new book was coming out, I thought it was time I should practice what I preach, and so I sought the services of a personal stylist.

Sally MacKinnon from “Styled by Sally” has been helping people overhaul their wardrobes and make the most of their shopping experiences for many years. I’ve crossed paths with her often through my work, especially as we’re both members of the City Precinct, a group of independent Melbourne businesses.

I knew Sally to be down to earth and easy to talk with, as well as seeing some great results she had achieved with others. I’ve also had plenty of opportunities to see how she dresses herself and I knew she’d have some fresh ideas for updating my own style, so I booked a three hour shopping session.

I’m a tough crowd – not only do I think I know a thing or two about dressing, I’ve developed my own style over many years and have simplified it into a few narrow characteristics: I like black dresses, with a plunging V neckline and shaped waist. Mid-calf with a swishing skirt, worn with Mary Janes or lace up boots and black lace or opaque stockings. Then I might add brightly coloured accessories and of course, there’s the pink hair – sometimes a boon, sometimes a hindrance.

Well aware that I was stuck in a comfortable rut, I wanted to try on different looks, especially as I suspected that I was dressing a bit old for my age. Drab and frumpy are my least favourite characteristics but my tastes (due to a changing body shape) felt like they were heading in that direction. Time to pull up the reins!

Sally met me at the Melbourne Emporium and we started with a chat over coffee: it was a hot day and I was impressed with her choice of fashion. She was wearing a modern update on a ’70s style shirtdress – perfect for her tall and slim figure, showing off her legs without compromising on comfort. She nailed “smart casual” and immediately had me at my ease – my default setting is a little dressier than most people so her style reassured me. It was what I would have chosen for her myself, so I felt like we were on the same page.

First Sally took me to Nicola Waite – a shop I had never been to before, but had a modern range of creative styles. The sizes go up to 22, so I didn’t have to fear that awfulness of not finding anything that fits. Sally had sent me a questionnaire before the day so I knew I could rely on her not to take me to places that wouldn’t have anything, which is such a relief: this is the benefit of a stylist, she knows all the shops and saves you the time and bother of falling in love with things that won’t work for you.

I particularly liked the structuralism of the “Bodice Tuck Dress” in black:

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Because I’m shorter than the model, it hit me just below the knees – which was a revelation, usually I wear my skirts longer so discovered this length is good for me, showing off my legs more – and the waist sat closer to my natural waist which looked even better when belted (and my waist looked tiny compared to all the foofy fullness of the skirt).

That was the second revelation – that I need to highlight my waist more than I have been doing. This is the risk of mislaying your girlish figure, you don’t always adjust to the new shape as well as you could and there’s a temptation to skirt over parts of your body but by doing so you’re losing definition.

I’m not fond of showing my bare upper arms, so this dress was worn with a sheer netting style top underneath – I’ve got a few of these left over from my goth days when I wore them under corsets.

Then we went to Leona Edmiston – I had been in there before but discovered that with my new BFF to advise me on the most flattering styles for my figure and suggest colours that were way out of my comfort zone, shopping was a breeze and I added four (!) new frocks to my wardrobe. Sally also arranged a discount for me. Then it was off to et al where I was almost overwhelmed with modern choices.

Many of my new dresses have come in handy in book signings, TV and newspaper articles and it’s been a pleasure to receive compliments on them, although some fein shock to see me not wearing as much black.

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Here I am in my new favourite frock the appropriately named “Sally” from Leona Edimiston and a vintage lace petticoat to contain the decolletage – happily signing lots of my new book at the Melbourne Dymocks shop in Collins St. Thank you Sally and Sally!

Personal styling sessions make excellent Christmas presents and Sally has kindly offered Circa readers a special discount on her services – book a three hour session for the first half of next year and receive a 10% discount off her already very reasonable rate of $325. Just let her know that you read it about it here! Thanks Sally x


13
Dec
2014
Posted by Nicole in Book, Book review, Talk 2 Comments

I’m having the time of my life – this week we launched “Style is Eternal” at Avid Reader in Brisbane and last week in Sydney at Berkelouw Paddington Sydney. This is so much fun: I love books, bookshops, book readers and best of all is having your own book and talking to shiny people about it! Book people are good people.

And just when I couldn’t get more excited about bookshops (and how great it is to find good ones in other cities) there was the St Kilda library, who kindly invited me back for a third time to talk about my passion for fashion.

Plus: there have been a couple of radio interviews (3AW and Radio Adelaide) and newspapers, online magazines and blogs. And I also appeared on Channel 9’s “Mornings” show – you can see me talking about celebrity style here.

Are you ready for some highlights? Here are some pics –

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A big article in the West Australian newspaper – thanks Susi for sending me the pic.

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Some of the wonderful ladies who came to see me at Avid Reader – the whole audience was amazing, especially considering how hot and humid it was. I love this bookshop so much. Plus: Krissy Kneen live tweeted me! Achievement unlocked.

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Mz Vicki and I at Avid Reader in Brisbane – read Vicki’s great blog post about the event here. Photo copyright Vicki Martin.

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A table filled with copies of my book: Berkelouw in Paddington. So many great things about this bookshop and they have beautiful old style slanted wooden shelves upstairs.

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Here I am demonstrating ways to wear scarves on stylish fashion blogger Nora. This pic is copyright Sydney Flapper. Here’s her terrific review of the Berkelouw event and my book.

Dymocks catalogue
My book featured in the Dymock’s catalogue alongside two of the most talented women in fashion!

Dymocks Sydney
And on display at Dymock’s Sydney – another really great old style bookshop with a mezzanine balcony cafe. Note that my book seems to be selling better than the other great title.

Future Beauty
I caught the Future Beauty exhibition in Brisbane! Japanese Avant Garde fashion! Highly recommended and full of inspiration.

Gabbi at Dymocks Chermside
Gabbi at Dymock’s Chermside asked me what my favourite word was – I replied “momentum”. I’m feeling a lot of that at the moment.

Kinokuniya
Lots of books to sign at Kinokuniya! Amazing bookshop, a new favourite and everyone is so nice. I didn’t use the sharpie – have discovered an author truth: we carry pens we like to write and sign with. I’m glad I signed a lot of books because “Style is Eternal” is currently one of their best sellers!

St Kilda library
Chatting about fashion at St Kilda library – where Cati created a wonderful display of vintage frocks and books and called me “fabulous”. Cati, I think you’re fabulous too.

Now, the book is available at good bookshops everywhere and of course at Circa – but if you’d like a signed copy here’s where to go:

Dymock’s Sydney, Bondi Junction, Chermside and Brisbane
Avid Reader, West End Brisbane
Circa Vintage online and in the city salon, where I can personalise a copy for you. All web and phone orders are sent via Express Post and we post the same or next business day, but don’t leave it too late if you’d like one for Christmas!


5
Dec
2014
Posted by Nicole in Calendar 2 Comments

St Kilda library have invited me back to talk about my new book – “Style is Eternal”.

Here are the details:
Fashion fades, but style is eternal. In these days of fast and disposable fashion, how do you make the most of what you wear without spending a fortune? How do you develop your own personal style, dress for an event, suit your figure or update for your age?

Join Nicole Jenkins (award winning author of “Love Vintage”) as she talks about her new book “Style is Eternal”, including where and how to shop, how to best use what you already have and how to care for it.

What: Style is Eternal fashion talk by Nicole Jenkins
When: Wed 10 Dec 2014 6.30-7:30pm
Where: – St Kilda library, 150 Carlisle St St Kilda
Cost - free!
Bookings essential - click here to book.
More informationat the library site.

I’ll bring along some copies of my new book too, and the library has copies too, hopefully available for borrowing. They also have a copy of my first book “Love Vintage” in case anyone would like to read that one too.


27
Nov
2014
Posted by Nicole in 1970s, 1980s, 1990s, 2000s, Designers, Exhibitions 2 Comments

One wonderful day I went – twice – to the National Gallery of Victoria to see the new exhibition on the work of Jean-Paul Gaultier.

Incredible. Amazing. Beautiful. There is so much that I’d like to say, but it’s best if his work speaks for itself. This is truly fashion as high art, couture quality, impeccable eye for detail. So kind and generous for Monsieur and the NGV to share it all with us.

All I can really say is “go and see it”. See it more than once, and take your time to admire all the little touches, the array of different textures, colours, shapes, the unlimited creativity. The strong and the delicate. The mind that sees beauty in unexpected and delightful places.

My favourite part? I’d be lying if I didn’t confess it was the moment when the great man himself swept past with his entourage, paused a moment, swept back and leaned in to say almost conspiratorially “….you have beautiful hair!”

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13
Nov
2014
Posted by Nicole in Book, New in store 2 Comments

My new book is out at bookshops on December 1st but I’ve received a small number of advance copies – very exciting! Here are some peeks inside – first, the cover that we all know and love, with a quote from Alannah Hill.

Style is Eternal cover

Here’s the contents – I love how they look like a label sewn into a frock. Please excuse the shadow from my iphone pics.
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There are lots of modern and vintage fashion photos – these are in the glove section, where I talk about the different lengths and types of gloves and how to wear them. Gloves = instant glamour.
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Plus new pics of burlesque bombshell Frankie Valentine in an assortment of styles, photographed by Dominic Deacon – here’s my favourite.
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Plus lots more vintage pics – ’30s rollerskaters! I suspect the tight fitting shorts are made of real rubber and shiny rayon satin, in those pre-Lycra days. Super cute, comfortable and practical too.
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Some of my favourite style icons are there too: love Amy and Gwen x
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There are sections to help you identify different styles of garments, with charming archival illustrations from fashion catalogues:
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We also photographed some beautiful pieces which were generously donated to my private collection, like this late ’30s silk georgette dinner dress with cut steel beads.
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How to overhaul your wardrobe and tips on putting together the perfect travelling wardrobe!
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and in a very personal touch, some original sketches of my own.
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You can pick up an early copy from Circa – only $45 and signed of course! If you’d like a personal message, please let me know. It will be out in bookshops on December 1st. Also – I’m doing some book events!

Sydneysiders can see me talk about the new book at Berkelouw Books in Paddington (very excited, this is one of my all time favourite bookshops and my old stomping grounds from when I lived at Five Ways) on Tuesday, December 2nd. Bookings essential.

Brisbaners can see me at Avid Books on Tuesday, December 9th. This means I can catch the Japanese fashion exhibition too. Please don’t forget to book.

Melbourners can see me at the Strictly Vintage market on November 30th, where I’m presenting a talk on ’30s fashions and signing books. I’ll talk about “Style is Eternal” too and help with your fashion dilemmas.

As an extra treat, many of the pieces featured in the new book are also available from the webshop so you can have your favourite frock with a bit of added history. See here.

Hope to see you at an event soon!

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12
Nov
2014
Posted by Nicole in Calendar, Costume Collections, Where to buy vintage

If you care about fashion in Australia you’re probably familiar with the Darnell Collection, the largest private collection of international couture in Australia, curated by Charlotte Smith and frequently put on display at exhibitions and events.

Over the past ten years, the collection has grown and grown and Charlotte is now offering up a selection for your acquisition, so she can focus on the more special pieces.

From the official site:
Theodore Bruce are proud to present the de-accession of The Darnell Collection with over 500 lots of antique and vintage fashion, including garments, accessories, lace and mannequins. Ranging from the Edwardian & Victorian era through to the 1980’s all lots to be sold unreserved.

What: Vintage Fashion: The Darnell Collection
When: 23 November 2014 – from 11am
Where: Theodore Bruce auctioneers, Primary Saleroom : 6 Ralph Street, Alexandria, NSW 2015, Australia.
Cost: free to attend, buy as much as you like
More information: See the catalogue online here.

If you do go to the auction to buy I recommend that you inspect each item carefully for damage, as it greatly affects the value – especially if you want to wear it. I always travel with a tape measure and this can be particularly useful at auctions where there may not be a facility to try things on.

Auctions offer a great way to pick up good things at reasonable prices and there are some very nice items available in this collection. Assume nothing though, as all items are sold “as is”.

I’ve gone through the catalogue and picked out some interesting pieces for you. My best pick is lot 187 – the silk velvet ’20s opera coat. Check out the Deco styling! Worthy of Miss Phryne Fisher.

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Lot 187 – An Cream Evening Cape with Contrasting Black Hem Detail with long neck sashes, smot[sic] at back collar, gathered over shoulders, zigzag pattern at back along hem, fully lined; silk; 1920s;

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Lot 249 – A Yellow Bridesmaid/Party Dress; comes with an original sketch by grant cowan featured in Dreaming of Dior page 138-139

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Lot 256 – A vintage calico cotton travel clothes line with pegs and hooks all original; excellent condition 13cm

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Lot 385 – A Victorian ear trumpet ceramic, silk thread, rubber; American

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Lot 136 – Two pairs of early 20th century spats and one single civil war spat felted wool, cotton, wool; American

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Lot 359 – A Blue Opera Coat with Blue Flower Embroidery Large bow to front, with hook and eye closure, elbow length wide sleeves, knee length; 1960s;

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Lot 34 – A Black and White Smock Style Dress sleeveless, collar with covered buttons down front, 2 large pockets on skirt; by Prue Acton (labelled); 1970s;

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Lot 48 – A Black and Rust Patterned Cocktail Dress bubble-style skirt.

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Lot 91 – A Black and Pink Party Dress with empire waist, wide waistband, appliqued flower pattern at hem with sequin detail, side zip closure, fully lined; by Chelsea Design, Labels still attached; 2000

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Lot 159 – A Peach Evening Dress with White Glass Bead Decoration lined, no waist band, round neck, sleeveless with bands of glass beading around armholes, sack shape typical of the twenties; 1920s;

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Lot 198 – A skirt and two jackets 1950s

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Lot 168 – Five Bathing Suits from the 1950s -1980s various labels

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Lot 164 – A Two Piece Seaside Romper Suit sleveless with no collar, button closure to front, has bloomers, unlabelled; early 1900s;


11
Nov
2014
Posted by Nicole in 1980s, 1990s, 2000s, Calendar, Exhibitions

Meanwhile, there’s something great on in Queensland too. From the official site:

‘Future Beauty: 30 Years of Japanese Fashion’ explores the tremendous innovation of Japanese fashion designers from the early 1980s to the present. With nearly 100 garments featured in the exhibition, ranging from the classic and elegant to outrageous, this will be a fascinating experience and rare opportunity to view these unique creations first hand.

Japanese fashion made an enormous impact on world fashion in the late 20th century. Designers such as Issey Miyake, Rei Kawakubo of Comme des Garçons and Yohji Yamamoto revolutionised the way we think of fashion today.

Their works will be shown alongside examples by the techno-couturier Junya Watanabe, a protégé of Kawakubo, together with the pioneer of the ‘Ura-Harajuku’ movement Jun Takahashi, and the new generation of radical designers including Tao Kurihara, Hiroaki Ohya, Matohu, Akira Naka, Hatra and mintdesigns.

Curated by eminent Japanese fashion historian Akiko Fukai, Director of the esteemed Kyoto Costume Institute in Japan, this exhibition explores the unique sensibility of Japanese design, and its sense of beauty embodied in clothing.

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What: Future Beauty: 30 Years of Japanese Fashion
When: 1 November 2014 – 15 February 2015 (Closed 14–16 November and Christmas Day) 10am to 5.30pm daily
Where: Queensland Art Gallery, Stanley Place, Cultural Precinct, South Bank, Brisbane
Cost: $16.50-21.50, see ticketing website for details
More information: at the QAG site.

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Comme des Garçons (Rei Kawakubo), Autumn/Winter 2012, Photography: Masayuki Hayashi. I can see Fashion Hayley looking great in this fabulous frock.


11
Nov
2014
Posted by Nicole in Calendar, Designers, Exhibitions

I hope to get over to Adelaide to see this great new exhibition – lucky Adelaide! Here are some details from the website:

Over 90 emblematic haute couture garments created by the world’s leading fashion designers will be drawn from the most comprehensive collection of French fashion in the world, the Musée des Arts Décoratifs and curated by the museum’s 20th and 21st Centuries Fashion and Textile Collection Chief Curator, Pamela Golbin.

‘The works selected for this exhibition perfectly illustrate the style of each of the mythical couturiers behind this history of luxury and sumptuousness. Spectacular designs by Cristobal Balenciaga, Gabrielle Chanel and Yves Saint Laurent follow one another in this chronological review, revealing the universality of fashion viewed as a history of art and beauty.’ Pamela Golbin

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Photo copyright the Art Gallery of South Australia

What: FASHION ICONS: MASTERPIECES FROM THE COLLECTION OF THE MUSEE DES ARTS DECORATIFS, PARIS
When: 25 October 2014 – 15 February 2015 from 10am to 5pm daily
Where: Art Gallery of South Australia, North Terrace, Adelaide.
Cost: $5-$25 see the site for information.
More information: see the Fashion Icons site.

There are some really great events too, including one this Saturday on collecting vintage fashion with the fabulous Margot Riley and Charlotte Smith – wish I could go but I’m otherwise booked. Lucky Adelaide! Oh, well, I can’t complain – we have Gaultier in Melbourne (pics to come, the exhibition is extraordinary, or should I say “extraordinaire!”)

If you can, I do recommend this exhibition as it looks wonderful, and offers a crash course in the most important fashion designs of the 20th century. I’m sure it has a wonderful catalogue too.

Fashion Icons - now showing
Photo copyright the Art Gallery of South Australia


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